Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 46

Thread: Generators - who's buying one?

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Getafix View Post
    I've decided to get a crowd in to come and advise on Solar and turbines for my place.
    I like the idea of initial upfront costs which the results in savings and less dependence on the grid.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Well it is not yet viable, unless you install yourself and can feed to the grid with minimal cost overhead.

  2. #32
    Gold Member Buffalohump's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Durban
    Posts
    941
    I would have preferred to go solar myself but it is a much steeper initial outlay. It is a far more comprehensive solution though, than a generator. You can feasibly run your entire household and just have Eskom as a back-up in case you have several days of overcast weather. You can also feasibly look at selling excess power back to the grid, if they ever get that sorted out (remote possibility). It just costs a lot more unfortunately. We worked out we would repay the investment in around 7 - 10 years. So not too bad if you are pretty settled in your crib and don't plan on moving.

    I am thinking that this current situation will likely galvanise the budding solar industry, hopefully resulting in more players and better pricing. The reality is that we will face considerable increases in the electricity price in years to come. Part of the problem is that Nersa has not granted Eskom the increases they asked for. That situation is now likely to change as Eskom is very deep in the hole. So when you factor in the likely above inflation increases in electricity prices, the solar option makes more and more sense.

    Quote Originally Posted by Getafix View Post
    I've decided to get a crowd in to come and advise on Solar and turbines for my place.
    I like the idea of initial upfront costs which the results in savings and less dependence on the grid.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  3. #33
    There is a pilot project on the go here in PE to establish the viability of grid feed.
    http://www.nelsonmandelabay.gov.za/C...aspx?objID=369

    I agree that it is the way forward. Dependence on "the system" is not going to be pretty.
    Pricing is not "properly" regulated.
    Don't want to get into a mud slinging match on my opinion of the future. Just trying to get myself prepared


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  4. #34
    Gold Member Buffalohump's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Durban
    Posts
    941
    Well that's a great step forward. The problem here is that we are not given any incentives to go with solar. If the current administration had vision they would subsidise the installation of solar systems for anyone who was keen on it. It is really the best option all round, both environmentally and economically as well as a long term solution to our energy crisis. But if they had vision, we wouldn't be in this pickle in the first place.

  5. #35
    Where I live it seems that installing solar grid feed is already feasible with payback in 6-7 years if nersa grants eskom more than 12%. If you need your own storage, payback is never with current projections. I am looking at grid tied, with about 4kWh in batteries (at 50%, 2000 cycles) for load shedding.

  6. #36
    Gold Member Buffalohump's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Durban
    Posts
    941
    Fired up the Honda this morning.... dang its loud! And they say these are the quiet ones. Using it to watch TV seems out of the question. Now thinking doing the 'battery back-up' option, while expensive, would have been the smarter move.

  7. #37
    member Blaza's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Blinkpan, Mpumalanga
    Posts
    255
    Cheked out that honda of yours. Very nice machine. The not so silent gennies make a helluva racket. And then there's the smokey petrol hum. I now understand the phrase "petrol head" better. Old folks used to dig a pit for the "engine" that made it less anoying. Put a bit of distance between yourself and the noise. Running the exhaust through a scrubber box also reduces the racket. Out in the rural areas the eskom levy is real bad. If you go off grid there you could buy a new genny every month... and you will use your money for your own benefit - not subsidise someone who is paying a flat rate. So having a generator is a good first step. Next one needs the inverter and then a nice deep cycle battery. Follow on with a solar panel and charge regulator. Gas stove and deep freeze next and a fridge off course. Total independence is more like a long term project. Oh, and we havent covered hot water yet... This is real depressing

  8. #38
    Gold Member Buffalohump's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Durban
    Posts
    941
    Thought you guys might enjoy this Carte Blanche insert on living 'off the grid'. The first dude they talk to will bring a smile to a few faces here I'm sure. I missed this ep myself but conveniently enough its on DSTV's website: http://carteblanche.dstv.com/player/761604/

  9. #39
    member JohanV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Vryburg
    Posts
    57
    I saw that insert, very interesting. I wish I could do it, but it is so expensive. Eskom hit us with 4 and a half hours today and it seems that is what we can expect from now on.

  10. #40
    Gold Member Buffalohump's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Durban
    Posts
    941
    Yes, we got hit last night with a 2 hour slot, from 4.30pm - 6.30pm. I hooked up the gennie to the TV and DSTV so that at least we had that to distract us. The Honda worked very well and the noise actually wasnt as bad as I thought it would be, especially once I hit the Eco Throttle switch. About as loud as a lawnmower I would say. There was barely any petrol in it and it ran for two hours with the TV, DSTV and a lamp hooked up.

    We have also recently acquired a CADAC four burner gas braai and that came in handy too. Made the whole dinner on it. I said to my wife that if we could put in a solar panel or two hooked up to one or two batteries to power the lights we could probably manage quite well. That would be about the most cost effective option all round I think.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •